2017 Audi Q2 Review - Asian Car Guide
April 25, 2018




2017 Audi Q2 Review

2017 Audi Q2 Review

The all-new Audi Q2 offers two model lines: the 1.4 TFSI design for $41,100 plus on-road-cost and 2.0-litre TDI quattro sport for $47,900 plus ORC. Both models share the sporty seven-speed S-tronic dualclutch automatic transmission as standard.

According to Andrew Doyle, Managing Director of Audi Australia the all-new Q2 will open Audi up to a new range of young and young-at-heart buyers.

The Audi Q2 itself comes in a striking design and palette of colours. Polygonal surfacing design unique to the Q2 in Audi’s line-up complements floatingblade C-pillars for a boxy appearance, but with coupe-like roof line.

While to me, it is not exactly beautiful, it is fresh unique and functional. Inside, the news is almost universally good. The dashboard’s form borrows heavily from the A3, itself a paragon of minimalistic modern chic.

Here the cabin is enlivened further, as part of an illumination package, by smartly appointed inlays with colour-selectable backlighting.

Audi’s excellent virtual cockpit, a configurable screen that replaces conventional dials in the instrument cluster is available as an option, featuring large speedo/tacho, or these can be reduced to allow other drive information feeds as well.

A position-adjustable headup display can be projected onto the windscreen in the driver’s field of view, for safer reading whilst driving. The technik package cost $2,500. Closer tactile inspection reveals some hollow plastic noticeable where higher Audi models would never deign to put them.

Yet, fitting are all close and the all-new-Audi Q2 overall aesthetic is tasteful to give a sophisticated, expensive feel.

The Audi Q2’s clever packaging courtesy of the versatile VW MQB common design platform means it is able to accommodate five adults comfortably and also have a boot only 15 litres smaller than the Q3. In standard configuration, luggage capacity is 405-litres.

With rear seats folded down, its capacity is 1,050-litres. A power tailgate is available as an option. Dimensions in metres are L 4.19, W 1.79, H 1.51 and WB 2.6, with 1.4L TFSI kerb weight of only 1280 Kg, aided by high tensile low weight steel constuction, and drag co-efficient is just 0.3.

Drive assisance options include pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control with stop/go that can maintain distance behind other vehicles, side ,active lane, cross traffic and parking assist. This turbo-charged 4-cylinder Audi behaves with the eager vigour we have come to expect from the best of its type, moving quickly and enthusiastically up the rev range, whilst emitting a quite pleasant muted growl.

The 2.0-litre TDI quattro test car responds promptly and linearly to a request for acceleration and shows little struggle even on the uphill. Body control is disciplined whilst turn-in is sharp, and grip levels inspire confidence.

I would describe the Q2 as nimble and entertaining to drive.

More importantly, the compact SUV communicates conditions from it’s four wheels with clarity. Ride quality is solid and comfortable.

Together with the customarily good level of visibility inherent in SUVs, the Q2 is effortless to place in tighter settings, be it narrow lanes or a mountain/country drive swarming with cyclists.

With no shortage of compact SUVs on the market, the all-new-Audi Q2’s success is contingent on its ability to marry a superior premium feel with citybiased SUV virtues of practically, modern technology and dynamic competence, and we think that based on these criteria, the Q2 is a formidable component of Audi’s compact SUV stable.